"Ramses was gone the next morning. When Nefret joined us for breakfast she was a trifle hollow-eyed and pale, but that might have been a normal reaction to such a hard parting. I did not feel I had the right to ask what they had said to one another—my sympathetic imagination supplied a good deal of the dialogue—but I did venture to inquire whether Ramses had been angry about us following him.”

The Golden One, Elizabeth Peters

In one phrase Amelia describes my entire experience with these books. 

dotcore:

Song of Storms.by Matt Rockefeller.
via INPRNT.

dotcore:

Song of Storms.
by Matt Rockefeller.

via INPRNT.

  

via mrseavey:

Erika Steiskal
———
Candy Quackenbush feelz. Really eager for the next book. Candy, Malingo and Gaza are still in the middle of falling. 

Erika Steiskal

———

Candy Quackenbush feelz. Really eager for the next book. Candy, Malingo and Gaza are still in the middle of falling. 

She was beautiful, elegant. Like a tall clear glass filled with raw pasta.

(Source: popsonnet)

image

I DID A THING!!!!!!!!!!!!

Mornings are great. I made a camera-switcher for the game in c#. 

ancientart:

The petroglyphs in the landscape of Tamgaly, Kazakhstan, dating from approximately 1400 BCE to the 20th century.

Offering us unique insight into the rituals and social organization of the pastoral peoples who inhabited this site through time, the archaeological landscape of Tamgaly contains about 5,000 petroglyphs (rock carvings), which are distributed throughout 48 complexes largely associated with burial grounds and settlements.

The central canyon has the densest concentration of petroglyphs, contains ‘alters,’ and has been interpreted to have had ritual significance. The central canyon is devoid of dwellings, and is thought to have been a place for sacrificial offerings.

During the Middle Bronze Age we see Tamgaly-type petroglyphs, which include zoomorphic beings, people, a huge variety of animals, and ‘solar deities (sun-heads).’ During the Late Bronze Age the petroglyphs become smaller in size, and display less variety in what is depicted. Here scenes of pastoral life are popular, reflecting the prominence of nomadic cattle breeding activities during the time. During the Early Iron Age, scenes showing the hunting of wild animals remain present, but we also see camels starting to appear in the art.

If you are interested in reading more about the ‘solar-headed’ petroglyphs I would recommend The Archaeology of Shamanism (2001, Routledge), specifically chapter 5. This publication is edited by Neil Price, professor of archaeology at the University of Aberdeen, who is a specialist on shamanism in archaeology.

The petroglyphs within the archaeological landscape of Tamgaly are listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site -their article on the landscape was of great use to me while writing up this post. Photos courtesy of & taken by Ken and Nyetta.