thevintagethimble:

Plantagenet (14th century): Horizontal Braiding, Gorget.Gorget - When a wimple is worn without a veil, pinned over hair coils on the side of the head (Fig. 19). Sometimes the coils were braided horizontally (Fig.18). Horizontal Braiding- popular in the mid 14th century, the head would go uncovered, but sometimes a fillet would support the plaits ( Fig. 22).

thevintagethimble:

Plantagenet (14th century): Horizontal Braiding, Gorget.
Gorget - When a wimple is worn without a veil, pinned over hair coils on the side of the head (Fig. 19). Sometimes the coils were braided horizontally (Fig.18). Horizontal Braiding- popular in the mid 14th century, the head would go uncovered, but sometimes a fillet would support the plaits ( Fig. 22).

Anonymous said: do you consider egyptians black? im only asking this because im an egyptian living in america and i recently had to fill out a paper for a college credit class and it asked for race and the options were black,white,asian,hispanic,native american/pacific islander and prefer not to disclose, i didnt really know what to say so i just said prefer not to disclose. sorry if you get asked this a lot, thanks!

Since anon is in the US, she could use the US Census definition:

bloglikeanegyptian:

honestly this is so stupid because this happened to me too when i was abroad and i usually fill out ‘white/other.’ it’s incredibly restrictive and US-centric - there’s never an “arab/north african” option.

my opinion on this is a little worthless because i don’t face consequences for it, but here’s what i’ve gathered from seeing egyptians/arabs abroad and being here. bear in mind this will get quite long because this is a very very complicated question and im gonna try to cover the bases especially bc half the ppl on this site have predetermined assumptions of what egyptians are.

yeah, egyptians are technically african american. and there is a vast majority of egyptians who have the same skin color/features of sudanese/somali people, who are considered and identify as black. usually, when i try to explain egyptian dynamics regarding ancient egypt, i say things like, “yes, most of the ancient egyptians were black by US standards, and most modern-day egyptians are, too” because these are terms people on here understand and so they recognise that a) egyptians weren’t replaced by colonisers and b) whitewashing egypt is wrong and it happens. a lot of my friends are considered and treated as black when abroad. one of the things i’ve noticed is that most foreigners are more understanding of dark-skinned egyptians than pale ones, because it matches up to their description of africa n all. a lot of dark-skinned egyptians in egypt consider themselves black without issue, because in egypt skin color is very literal. black/white is literally about your skin color, not about your race (almost all egyptians, however dark-skinned, consider themselves caucasian. it’s like, caucasian with a tan, caucasian with a serious tan, etc. this is actually what’s written in our social studies curriculum, iirc. the caucasian bit, not the tan bit.)

however that said

i see that one reason egyptians shouldn’t identify with “african american” is because egyptians have no concept of african american history or oppression. despite common belief, egyptians were never enslaved by white americans nor directly oppressed by US white supremacy. as far as i know, most egyptians in america are recent immigrants, or the children of recent immigrants. so does this make it right for them to identify as black? but then again, dark-skinned egyptians living in the US might be facing the same racial discrimination of black people in the US right now. so would that be fair?

now none of this is helped by the appropriation of “nubian” titles everywhere, because nubians are a) egyptian which means once again never taken to america and b) already oppressed in their own country. also not helped by the whole “ancient egypt was pitched black” thing because if you do meet a dark-skinned egyptian boy, does that make him an “indigenous egyptian” and therefore black? i know six billion dark-skinned egyptian boys who pass for black, were raised perfectly comfortably in egypt and are pretty anti-black themselves but don’t see a problem with it because they’re dark-skinned and US-centricism deems that everyone who’s dark-skinned and african is black (a good example of this is the use of the N-word in the recent youm7 article. people don’t see a problem with it because ‘efredy el editor kan asmar?’ [what if the editor was dark-skinned?] to egyptians, “black” is about skin color, not about a history of systematic prejudice.) this is also echoed in egypt’s treatment of africans. because so many of us are dark-skinned, it never registers as racism. it’s xenophobia usually. while there is colorism abound, systematic discrimination in egypt is based on classism and other factors (religion/sect/politics/sexuality.) egyptians mostly discriminate based on nationalism. if you pass as egyptian, you’re good, even if you look white or filipino or whatever. but even if you look extremely egyptian and don’t act it (whether via speech or mannerisms), then things become different. egyptians can be extremely xenophobic.

(note: this differs in certain areas, such as The Crater of Hell known as Sinai where they kidnap and torture eritrean and sudanese refugees for money etc, but applies to most of egypt. cairo and alexandria also tend to be more cosmopolitan and diverse.)

anyway the reason i’ve gone through the trouble of explaining egyptian racial dynamics is because of the following: once dark-skinned egyptians are identified as black or african-american, it opens up the door for other egyptians to identify as such, too. egyptians literally just see it as “well, he’s slightly less tan than i am so what difference does it make?” of course, in the US it can make a difference between life and death, anti-black racism and anti-arab racism. but egyptians don’t really see it that way because these aren’t the kind of problems we regularly face. if an egyptian is slightly darker skinned, they might be told by their family to buy some fair-and-lovely, and they’ll be the butt of jokes and microaggressions, but they won’t be more likely to go to jail or not get jobs (unless it’s modeling or fair and lovely commercials, probably.) their lives will not be threatened because of it.

so now it becomes the problem of unifying all egyptians, or deciding who passes as what, and who lives where. some egyptians go abroad for uni and come back. some live abroad and come back, some permanently immigrate. egyptians abroad are a big deal as well, because we have a high percentage of our population living outside the country but still hold citizenship and vote.

anyway, these are very scattered thoughts and the conclusion is honestly: i don’t know. i don’t have the authority to decide. i’m a white-passing egyptian so i know for sure i can’t with good conscience tick “african-american” or “black.” i know it’s bullshit that we have to conform to westernised racial dynamics. i know it’s bullshit that most egyptians don’t recognise their own prejudice and anti-blackness. but this is some information to help you decide, i guess.

White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Taken from the US census website.

Not that these definitions should be taken with any real meaning. According the census, there are 5 race options: White, Black, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian, or Pacific Islander. Hispanic/Latino people are considered an “ethnicity,” not a race, so their distinctions are handled in a different category. No other ethnic groups are accounted for. 

Why do these surveys never bother to define what they mean by white? They all have this attitude of “if you’re actually white, then you know you’re white.”

elvishness:

hades and persephone at the beach uwu

elvishness:

hades and persephone at the beach uwu

goddess-of-smut:

Temple of Horus at Edfu, Egypt.

goddess-of-smut:

Temple of Horus at Edfu, Egypt.

(Source: goddessoftheblackcoast)

Until then I had thought each book spoke of the things, human or divine, that lie outside books. Now I realized that not infrequently books speak of books: it is as if they spoke among themselves. In the light of this reflection, the library seemed all the more disturbing to me. It was then the place of a long, centuries-old murmuring, an imperceptible dialogue between one parchment and another, a living thing, a receptacle of powers not to be ruled by a human mind, a treasure of secrets emanated by many minds, surviving the death of those who had produced them or had been their conveyors.
philliplight:

I read Neil Gaiman’s “Stardust” recently and doodled the severely pissed off and feisty fallen star, Yvaine.

philliplight:

I read Neil Gaiman’s “Stardust” recently and doodled the severely pissed off and feisty fallen star, Yvaine.

maggie-stiefvater:

Morning in the office.

I am listening to Vampire Weekend and my feet are cold.

this is the best office

a fart so horrible that it made me miss my dad

hermionejg:

23, or I Got Too Tipsy on G&Ts So Now I Am Eating Lentils.